Nodepage

Women raising healthier livestock

Fathia lives in Klana-Aiarb village in Port Sudan. There are 150 households and each has camels, goats and sheep which they milk and earn an income from selling the milk and making yoghurt.

Fathia’s community is extremely conservative.  Women do not show their faces and are often not allowed to interact with men. Since Practical Action has begun working with them, their culture is beginning to change.

Women were specifically selected for the project to build their knowledge and skills on the welfare of the animals in order to empower them.

An association was formed and has grown to 20 members. FHelpathia plays a key role in disseminating knowledge to members of the group and their communities. Fathia no longer covers her face and feels comfortable and confident in communicating with all members of the community.

Before the project, disease amongst livestock was rife.  Many animals died of preventable and treatable diseases.

“If one goat was infected, they all would become infected and die.” She told us.

"Members of the villages would use indigenous medicine to treat disease, “We used indigenous medicine, something lemon and sometimes fire. All local solutions.”

Unfortunately, the local solutions didn’t always work and posed issues of animal welfare, “Sometimes we used to heat metal and burn the animal to treat infection.”

Since the project began, Fathia and the other women have been able to train local farmers in best practice, improve their access to markets and provide medicine for the animals. They also provide important information to farmers on where their animals can safely graze.

For Fathia and other members of the association, this project not only ensures that livestock is healthy and farmers are able to earn an income, it also gives them the knowledge and power to truly change their lives.

“We are spending more time together as we receive the training. The knowledge has given us confidence and has empowered us to change our culture.”

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