That lady is wearing boots!

???????????????????????????????Before my journey to Bangladesh I was told to prepare to be stared at, as some of the people I would meet might never have seen a white lady before. So I was expecting comments on my white skin, maybe my blond hair showing from underneath my headscarf, or even my height… at 5ft 7” I must seem like a giant compared to women in Bangladesh.  I am sure all of that happened but I was told that what was really causing a stir and a few giggles was the fact that I was wearing boots!

Despite being obviously different the welcome I received when I visited a small village, which had benefited from Practical Action’s support, was simply wonderful. Some of the braver children tried out their English asking me ‘How do you do’ and ‘what is your name’. Abkor, one of the older men an I was told was the ‘unofficial boss’ insisted on having his photo taken shaking hands with me and throughout the visit tried to get his baby boy to call me ‘auntie’! The women all wanted to know how many children I had and how old they all were.  I made them laugh when I showed them how tall my boys were.

Then I met Ria. Ria is an 18 year old girl who lives in the village with her husband.  She spoke good English so we could speak without an interpreter.  She was thrilled that we had visited  her village and very quickly invited me into her home and insisted on making me a meal.  I am in Bangladesh with the film company Ignite  Creative to film for some science videos and Ria was keen to help. She quickly became the ‘star’ in our first video which will show how important water access is in technology justice.

children palying at well Korok RoyRia explained how the village has two water pumps, one is ring pump, that takes water from deep in the ground  and can be used for drinking, while the other pump, a  tube pump,  does not go so deep and the water can be used for washing and cleaning. She said her grandmother remembers before they had any wells and they had to drink water from the pond, just filtering through cloth, and that this often made them sick  and gave them skin diseases because of the viruses in the water.   They were all very grateful for the wells, as well as the toilets and houses that Practical Action had helped them build.

 

As I was shown round the village, feeling a bit like the pied piper, I felt incredibly proud to work for the organisation that had helped improve the lives of these lovely people. People who despite being poor and having very few possessions are happy, proud of their achievements and live in a close knit and supportive community.  I came away feeling there is an awlful lot we could learn a lot from them.

One response to “That lady is wearing boots!”

  1. Mahobul Says:

    Excellent indeed. I am proud to be part of the story.

Leave a reply