Juliet – the water entrepreneur


September 7th, 2016

“I’m so glad that Practical Action didn’t look down on me like everyone else. They picked me up and dusted me off.”

Juliet lives in Kajiado, Kenya and Practical Action supported her by helping her to access a loan to start up her own water business. Juliet no longer has to struggle to earn a living by making charcoal which was back-breaking and dangerous work.

In the mountains and forests where she used to burn charcoal to make her hand-to-mouth living, she encountered wild animals and bandits. She was once bitten by a snake and came close to standing on a poisonous viper. Her most frightening experience occurred when she was pregnant: she went up the mountain and was confronted by a man in a mask. She fled and he followed; “he wanted to rob and rape me”. Hungry and expecting a child, Juliet had to stop running. Fortunately, when she stopped she noticed three other men sat down – “they were my salvation”. The men stood up and ran after the attacker.

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Just before Juliet had her baby, she could not make it up the mountain to get her charcoal and it got stolen. After she had her baby, her husband brought the charcoal down from the mountain for her and Juliet then sold it. But it was not making Juliet enough money and so she had to supplement her income. She washed clothes for her neighbours but she still struggled to afford enough food to feed her family. “I reached my end. I’d even decided to buy poison and kill myself because I’d reached my end! No-one wanted to associate with us. I was dirty; I was so black [from the charcoal].” Juliet could not afford water to clean herself and local people said that she would “die soon” as she was so thin. The day after she gave birth to her youngest son, Juliet went out to sell charcoal. No one helped her and no one knew she had had a baby because she was so malnourished.

Juliet recounts having a premonition that she should come back to her local town and start selling water. A friends’ mother told Juliet about a local mentor who was creating awareness of a loans scheme. Juliet carried on living in the bushes for a month burning charcoal as well as doing other jobs alongside to earn enough money for a loan. She stayed in the forests for days on end, to ensure that people didn’t steal her charcoal. She made 200 Kenyan Shillings (KSH) per day – equivalent to around £1.50. When Juliet went to clean for people, she took her baby with her and would have to leave him outside the house, making somewhere comfortable to lay him. Through her constant work, Juliet managed to save 2000 KSH to access the loan. Juliet built a savers group of 10 people – which was hard to build due to her status – and each member had to contribute: their group loan was 50,000 KSH.

Juliet and her youngest son show off the water containers that have made their life comfortable

Juliet and her youngest son show off the water containers that have made their life comfortable

Juliet said: “There was no connection from the water company, so I couldn’t fill my tank before I bought it. My daughter and I saved money and we didn’t tell my husband. We got the connection and I surprised him! We managed to buy the water storage tank.”

Once the water tank arrived, Juliet began to sell a lot of water which ensured that her local community had access to safe and clean water. The money she made from the water enabled Juliet to go back to the bank and ask for another loan to buy another tank. However, when they received the loan, Juliet’s husband took 12,000 KSH (almost £1,000) of it, as he wanted to go back to his home town to sell some land. He told Juliet he would buy a motorbike and set up a grocery shop for her to run, but he left her with his debt. “He was away for 2 months and he called me. He asked me for 2,000 more. I helped him because he was supposed to be setting up a better life for us.” Juliet did not hear from her husband for a further month and found out through his son that he had sold the land. When he did call, he was in a disco and told Juliet she was too old for him now. “He is 67 and has no teeth!” Juliet exclaimed.

Juliet’s husband had received money from the land he sold and instructed the new land owner to call Juliet and warn her not to look for him. He went to Tanzania for a 2 week holiday and “surrounded himself with beautiful women because he had money. I continued running the business and saved enough money to buy the second tank”. Julia repaid the loan and now has her own savings.

Juliet with her water storage tanks

Juliet with her water storage tanks

Her estranged husband found another woman and told her that he had a successful water business, that it belonged to him and that his ex-wife had stolen it. They arrived at Juliet’s home to take the business, but Juliet “chased them away with a machete.” The husband went to the police and reported the business stolen. Juliet went to the police station armed with her documents and explained what had happened. Her husband was told to go and never come back.

Despite her struggle for money and being accused of stealing the business, Juliet is determined to succeed. She has even set up another new business, rearing poultry. “It was good that my husband left. I have gone to hell and back. He tried everything to make my life hell; he even tried to sell my water tanks… My husband left me with debt. He left me with a baby. But I am free, I am happy and I will not stop! I want my own land; I am working hard and praying hard.”

7 responses to “Juliet – the water entrepreneur”

  1. Roger Says:

    Dear Juliet,
    Your story is heart-rending. You have done so well. It is people like you that inspired me to give my very small support as a pensioner.

  2. Geoff Says:

    What great courage and determination! In any country this would be a triumph and will inspire more supporters.Keep going!

  3. John Says:

    It’s not at all clear in what way Practical Action helped access the necessary loan. From the report, Juliet seems to have done it all herself.

  4. Andy Says:

    Hi John, she pretty much sums it up in the first sentence: “I’m so glad that Practical Action didn’t look down on me like everyone else. They picked me up and dusted me off.”

  5. Judith Says:

    What amazing determination and resilience. I am very impressed that Juliet kept going as I am sure at many points there must have been such a temptation just to give up.

  6. Nyonje Levin Says:

    Hallo Andy,
    Do pass my regards to this resilient and determined woman who may just end up to be a motivation not only to the young ladies but the struggling boys and girls of this country, Kenya. Its a real night mare. As a young Engineer, I want to thank Practical action whose newsletters i get for the global social impact. It inspires us to purpose to transform our communities to realize food and financial security. I am inspired.

  7. Azeez Yussuf Olayiwola Says:

    Juliet is a rare inspiration of success. it’s clearer now she could have been a greater success a long time ago if not for her marriage/husband. While thanking practical action for this and others known and unknown, I bid for a clearer picture of how to access help on renewable/Eco friendly energy generation.

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