Archive for October, 2016

Celebrating sanitation month

Friday, October 28th, 2016 by

Clean water is something we take for granted but it is a basic human right that many are often denied.  There are 2.5 billion people in the world that lack access to improved sanitation and 748 million people that don’t have clean drinking water. Nearly 1,400 children die each day from diseases caused by lack of sanitation and unsafe water.

In 2015, the United Nations introduced their new Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to end poverty. Goal 6 is to ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all.

It’s Sanitation Month in Bangladesh and we have been celebrating our commitment to reaching the water and sanitation SDG through projects like ‘Delivering Decentralisation’ in Bangladesh, which you can find out more about here.

Bangladesh slum pic

The Delivering Decentralisation project supports people living in slums in Bangladesh, Nepal and Sri Lanka to influence local authorities and service providers in the delivery of improved urban services.

We established slum community-based organisations, which brought residents together to identify their needs and priorities and build links with and influence local authorities. Through our training on good governance and strengthening of town-wide forums, our local teams changed the mind-set of government officials towards slums. They now integrate community action plans prepared by slum residents into city development plans and allocate budget for them to be delivered.

The project also helped build roads, toilets, water supply points and introduce waste collection services, including turning faecal waste into compost and biogas.

But we believe that lasting change is achieved not just by the direct delivery of projects on the ground but also by making knowledge available to the poorest people and in encouraging institutions and governments to adopt approaches that favour the poor.

In Bangladesh we are working with the Prime Minister’s office to ensure the safe management of faecal sludge is included as a priority in the Government’s action plan for SDG 6. We have also been working with the Bangladesh government to develop a national framework for faecal sludge management, ensuring that human waste from pit latrines is disposed of safely, rather than being dumped in drains and water sources and causing diseases. This will create job security for informal waste workers and improve the health and wellbeing of at least 30 million people living in urban areas.

As part of our work with the Bangladesh government we were given the responsibility of organising celebrations in three districts (Bagerhat, Faridpur and Satkhira) for Global Handwashing Day under the national sanitation month campaign. The day was celebrated with a rally and discussion session among different NGOs, government officials and civil society.

Our team in Bangladesh lead a rally on Global Handwashing Day

Our team in Bangladesh lead a rally on Global Handwashing Day

Our other teams across the globe celebrated Global Handwashing Day as an opportunity to teach people across the globe a thing or two about good hygiene.

Our Sudan team, for example joined students  and  communities at Twait School in Kassala to teach them  the  importance  of  washing  their hands with soap and water at critical times.

Mohammed Tahir Adam Samra, a student at Twait school, said: “Now I can prevent my self from abdominal diseases  that cause me to absences from school, so I could get better grades on the exam.”

We couldn’t help children like Mohammed Tahir without your support. Please help us to work with communities around the world to prevent diseases and save lives and spread the word that more needs to be done to give people access to clean water and sanitation.

Is small still beautiful? Or is poverty too big?

Wednesday, October 26th, 2016 by

The first time I came across the idea of simple, poverty-fighting technology was in Lesotho in 2011, when I saw a roundabout that doubled up as a water pump. Whenever the local kids played on the roundabout, it would bring up water into the village well, giving the community a safe drinking water supply. Genius! I was captivated by the essence of this straightforward project that was making a huge difference to everyday life for some of the world’s poorest people.

The next time I came across this “intermediate” or “appropriate” technology was at university. We were asked to discuss whether these kinds of small-scale, people-focused technological interventions in developing countries were still relevant. Fair to say, I was shocked! I couldn’t imagine anyone coming up with an argument against the kinds of projects that I’d seen working successfully and appropriately first hand.

But then I found it. How can a few small, basic projects make a difference to the huge problem of poverty across our globe? According to the United Nations, one in eight people live in extreme poverty. Practical Action has found that over 840 million people are undernourished and over a third of the developing world doesn’t have access to acceptable sanitation facilities. With statistics this terrifying, how can we possibly think we can make a difference? One reason, we found, that people don’t support charities, is because they simply don’t know where to start. Poverty is too big a problem to tackle. So, as fundraisers, as awareness-raisers, as people who want to make a difference, what do we do? How do we encourage people to give when to them, their £5 or £10 or even £100 feels like a drop in the ocean?

E. F. Schumacher

E. F. Schumacher

The reason I was first fascinated by that roundabout was because it was, as EF Schumacher put it, small but beautiful. A design straightforward enough to be implemented in a rural, isolated community, used immediately, and made sustainably. I saw real people using it, and met children who had a safe water supply and therefore a much brighter future. Seeing a project up close and personal makes it so much easier to invest in, and easier to invest in similar ones in the future.

If only it was possible to take every supporter to see a project that they have helped to fund. Financially and logistically this isn’t possible, but we can still make individuals feel connected. Hearing names and stories, and seeing faces changes poverty from something that feels remote and far away to something that anyone can help to eradicate. Perhaps we can’t end poverty in one fell swoop but surely doing something beautifully small is better than doing nothing at all?

In a world where having the latest technology is up there in most people’s priorities, creating technologies that bring energy, water, sanitation and risk reduction strategies must be relevant and important. And yes, the projects may be small. But the outlook and overall impact certainly isn’t. As I learn more about Practical Action, the work that’s happening and the plans for work to come, it’s difficult to not catch the excitement. Last year, Practical Action helped 1.7 million people with simple solutions to get out of poverty. These small projects are making a massive difference.

Zeer pot fridge keeping vegetables fresh

Zeer pot fridge keeping vegetables fresh

One such project is the zeer pot fridge. This simple fridge, made from local materials in Sudan, can hold up to 12kg of fruit and veg. Carrots and okra that would have been rotten within 4 days in the Sudanese heat can now last up to 20 days, meaning that families don’t have to battle hunger and even famine. Hawa Abbas explained to Practical Action that her family’s life “has been so much better” since using her zeer pot fridge. The fridges can be made locally and support families who are already proficient at producing their own crops. Supporting projects like this, no matter how small, is vital because they are making a real difference to real lives every day.

If you’ve been inspired to make a small but beautiful difference, please contact us at fundraising@practicalaction.org.uk for more information and resources, or to learn more about Practical Action’s projects, have a look at what we do.

Block making machines in Sudan

Monday, October 24th, 2016 by

Practical Action has achieved a major breakthrough in the block-making industry in Eastern Sudan through development of intermediate technology in a rural context and active local participation.

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In in collaboration with a local manufacturer, we have been able to carve a niche by transforming the old conventional version of the block-making machine into a revolutionary pre-cast block-making machine to match the development and sustainability needs of the Aqua 4 East project.

The machine was developed with a moderate productive capacity in compliance with the requirements of the WASH sector and to address guidelines of the project.

The hand-operated machine has been transformed primarily to be used for latrine construction. However, the machine can also be used for building high density blocks and bricks for other construction purposes.

Its unique features are based on the following characteristics:14439662238_c81506fb8a_o

  • No vibration – instead high pressure is compensated to replace vibration.
  • Durability and corrosion resistance.
  • Soil stabilized bricks
  • Adjustable prefab different sized moulds which saves material (cement)
  • The hollow centre of the block narrows the wall thickness without compromising on wall stiffness
  • Environmentally friendly
  • Zero waste hence cost effective
  • Compact and lighter weight compared to previous versions14646213863_e01f270a7e_o
  • High safety
  • No need for electric power
  • Low maintenance
  • Block manufacturing can be turned into a profitable business for many people as no special skills are required for operating the machine.

 

How to maintain momentum: Fundraising edition

Tuesday, October 18th, 2016 by

So you’ve had that great idea – you are raring to go. But how do you keep up the momentum? After having the idea to end all ideas, it can sometimes be quite difficult to keep the money coming in. So here are a few ideas to keep your audience – and yourself – engaged with the grand challenge ahead.

Get your social media on

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Fundraising for Practical Action

Social media is tricky. It can be hard to know sometimes how much to post: are those ten carefully crafted pictures of your trip abroad enough? Or are they too much? It’s important to get the balance right, and that applies to fundraising as well. You don’t want to overload your audience, but you do want to keep them informed. Social media is the key to engaging people today, and so to keep those pounds pouring in you have to strike a balance. When engaging people in your fundraising journey it is important to create a sense of story. If you are posting pictures of your progress, consider how those pictures might be viewed within the wider narrative. It’s important to include people in your story – if someone donates a large amount of money, or joins you in your fundraising efforts, why not take the time to thank them? The more people you involve, the more potential your post has. Always make sure anything you post can be understood and shared by others – the more people that see your posts, the more money you make!

Challenge yourself

If you are fundraising for a specific cause – say by climbing Kilimanjaro – why not keep people engaged by staging smaller events in the lead up to the main event? Try attending an event in all your mountain gear, and get people really talking about what you are trying to do. By regularly refreshing your fundraising output, you keep people talking and engaged in the task at hand. The more you get people talking, the more attention your cause will receive. Utilising those natural networks is an essential part of raising more money – friend of a friend, and all that. People are a natural resource when trying to reach more people, so if you can keep yourself fresh in the minds of those with deep pockets, you’ll be well on your way to raising a few more pounds. Challenging yourself, and the people you are trying to reach, is a fun and fresh way to keep people clicking.

Practical Action challenge eventer

Practical Action challenge eventer

Keep it simple

People today are very busy, and very easily distracted. If you want to keep people on board with your fundraising journey, you’ve got it keep it simple. Whether you use a JustGiving page or a collection pot, make sure your fundraising pot is readily accessible. With every post you make, every event you attend, and every tweet you hashtag, make sure the appropriate donation channel is attached in a glaringly obvious way. Keep the donation forms straightforward, the attached links direct and the pleas for attention on point. It only takes the smallest reason to dissuade someone from parting with their money so make sure you never give someone the opportunity to talk themselves out of giving their money to you!

Put yourself on show

Practical Action's 50th anniversary quilt

Practical Action’s 50th anniversary quilt

When your fundraising journey begins, the very first people you’ll ask to donate will be the ones who already care about you. While you might inspire a larger following later on in your fundraising journey, those first steps that you take will be with people who have already invested in you. In a world with so many problems, the key to cutting through is to make your cause personal to you. Why did you decide to fundraise for us? What does this cause mean to you? The demands on people’s pockets can sometimes be high, so to keep people spending, you have to tell them why it matters. Why are you doing this? If you connect with them, show them what this means to you, you might just find people are more willing to part with their hard earned cash. Often people connect more with you as an individual, than they do with an issue, so highlighting why this is important to you is key to them understanding why they should donate.

If you are currently fundraising for Practical Action, and want to talk/discuss your progress contact at: fundraising@practicalaction.org.uk  or visit the fundraising page.

Make handwashing a habit

Monday, October 17th, 2016 by

So many global days are commemorated and at times you ask for what? After understanding the background, you will learn to appreciate why.

On Saturday it was Global Handwashing Day – a campaign to motivate and mobilize people around the world to improve their handwashing habits by washing their hands with soap at critical moments throughout each day.

handwshing in Zimbabwe using a tippy tap

This simple action of handwashing, when practiced religiously can reduce the risk of illness and death from diarrhoeal diseases. With 1.7 million children dying from these causes each year, I certainly think that is a great reason to celebrate the day!

In Zimbabwe we have continued to experience recurrent water and sanitation related diseases outbreaks despite efforts by various governments and Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) to educate the community. In Bindura, Practical Action Southern Africa has used podcasting technology to raise water and sanitation hygiene awareness (WASH) and reduce diarrheal diseases.

Through Practical Action’s WASH work, students and community members have been taught the importance of handwashing. Some were with the excuse that handwashing needs soap, but they were taught to use ash as it produces the same results as soap.

students in Zimbabwe handwashing

Health clubs were also formed to help spread the messages using podcasting, dramas or word of mouth, which have improved hygiene practices at individual, school and home level.

Huge successes have been recorded on handwashing. Health club members together with family members now wash their hands before engaging in any activity; for example, before eating and after visiting the toilet. Washing hands using soap has now become a habit to many. People are no longer using the traditional method of washing hands in one dish. The use of jugs, soap and running water is now the order of the day.

Water is poured over each person’s hands in turn and is then thrown away to avoid cross infection. Many of the participants from health clubs now know the correct handwashing practices.

Most children used to miss school due to sickness like diarrhoea and Malaria, but after some teachings from school health masters on the importance of handwashing, this is now history.

Habitat III: The buzz word is “implementation” – but will anything really change?

Monday, October 17th, 2016 by

Quito Habitat IIIThis week in Quito, the UN Secretary General and delegations from around the world are gathering for the Habitat III conference, and to sign up to the “New Urban Agenda”. This is the first all-UN meeting since the SDGs were agreed and the Paris Climate Agreement was signed. It is a once-in-twenty years opportunity for all member states to agree to a more sustainable, equitable, resilient future for the world’s cities and urban spaces.

Practical Action is here, speaking at events, and as a member of the General Assembly of Partners, and the World Urban Campaign. We are talking about a greater voice for slum dwellers and the informal sector based on our urban water, sanitation and waste management work. A team from our Latin America office are here talking about the great work we do on disaster risk reduction in urban contexts in general, and as part of the Zurich flood resilience alliance.

Unlike many UN negotiations, the debate here is less about agreeing the fine details of the text, and more about what will follow. The buzz word everywhere is about ‘implementation’. We need to move from discussion to putting this new agreement into practice on the ground. And the need for that is enormous. The world’s urban populations continue to grow, and with it urban inequalities and the number people living in dire poverty is also growing. People continue to settle on lands which are at risk of natural disasters. And at the same time, evictions of slum dwellers continue, sometimes in the name of development.

facilitators-raju_origThis stunning set of photographs taken by women slum dwellers as part of a PhD project we are jointly supporting with the Bartlett Centre, UCL, shows some of the daily struggles of accessing water in Kathmandu.

The Habitat III process is calling for ‘implementation’ and Practical Action among many others is already implementing work in the spirit of the New Urban Agenda: making space for the voices of slum dwellers and informal workers, ensuring they can live with dignity and without fear in safer, cleaner environments. We were already doing this, and will continue to do this.

Home in a slum in Faridpur, proud of their community

Home in a slum in Faridpur, proud of their community

So what added value with having a global agreement bring? Past agreements of this sort provided some added leverage for a few years, and then were largely forgotten, having very little influence. First, it is only if this agreement can be tied both to the SDGs and to global accountability mechanisms that it will really have some traction. Second, it needs to be localised and made real not at the level of national governments, but for local authorities and city leaders.

The agreement requires a report on progress to the UN General Assembly every four years, feeding into the High Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development as a way of ensuring coherence with the Sustainable Development Goals. But will this really be enough to ensure progress? So for all the excitement of a global agreement being signed this week, this is surely just the start. Much work remains to be done to lock-in the good words and turn them into something meaningful.

Practical Action at Habitat III

Tuesday 18th: 8-10am, National Library CSO Stakeholder Roundtable

Tuesday 18th: 8-9am R7 Building Inclusive and Resilient Cities for the urban poor to withstand natural disasters. Practical Action Peru DRR lead Pedro Ferradas talking about our experiences of DRR and reducing vulnerabilities.

Wednesday 19th: 9:30-10:30 R12 Practical Action side event: Slum Dwellers, youth, city-wide planning and accelerating urban service delivery together with DPU and World Vision International.

Video of Lucy speaking about the issues that matter to Practical Action as part of the World Urban Campaign.

 

What if? Risk prevention, urban planning and Habitat III

Monday, October 17th, 2016 by

What if instead of reducing risks, we avoid creating risks in the first place? What if, instead of building dykes to protect flood-prone riverbanks where people live, we convert these areas into public areas [rather than residential areas], roads, gardens, soccer playgrounds or any infrastructure that could be flooded without major impacts?

In the technical language of Disaster Risk Management, this issue lays within ‘risk prevention’, or ‘reducing exposure to hazards’. Exposure to hazards is one of the main causes of people´s vulnerability. It looks quite easy to implement: we only need to prevent people from building their houses in high risk areas. That should not be problematic, assuming that they know that the area is dangerous, right?

Yes, that should not be difficult in a city where there is appropriate housing for everyone: safe, cheap, and relatively well located (near to work, relatives and social services such as schools and hospitals). Unfortunately, in many cities the housing offer is still insufficient to address the needs of the poor.

Self-built homes in high risky areas appears too frequently as a satisfactory option for poor people. In Peru, it is estimated that 80% of the housing is self-built[1].  Most of these constructions do not respect quality standards, including land titles, trained masons, materials of quality. In Lima, the capital of Peru, only 3% of the self-built houses can be considered as “formal” settlements[2]. Many of them are also located in high risky areas, especially with landslide and flood hazards.

Self-built houses in a risky area in Peru prone to landslides.

Self-built houses in a risky area in Peru prone to landslides.

We cannot stop people from building their home in risky areas without providing them with a relevant housing alternative: this is where Disaster Risk Management meets land planning and Habitat issues.

In February 2016, Practical Action Peru promoted the creation of a national civil society network to improve Peruvian cities, with a strong focus to attack the roots of urban risks. The Peru Habitat Committee was born, gathering 23 local NGOs. During eight months, the committee discussed the challenges Peruvian cities are facing, and what could be done to improve disaster risk management, basic services, land planning, governance, etc. The full report can be downloaded here. And it is now time to spread the word to make these recommendations a reality: join us during our side-event at Habitat III on Tuesday 18th, in the Central University of Quito, from 9am to 10am!

[1] Overseas Development Institute (ODI), On the path to progress, 2015). See https://www.odi.org/publications/9623-peru-urban-water-sanitation-slum-cities-lima-service-delivery

[2] Cámara Peruana de la Construcción. (2015, Abril). La informalidad en la construcción es una “bomba de tiempo”. 23-31. Informe Económico de la Construcción Num. 3, 23-31

Global Handwashing Day: Making handwashing a habit

Friday, October 14th, 2016 by

For many of us, washing our hands is a habit acquired from childhood. We unconsciously wash our hands after using the bathroom, eating and preparing meals.

Teaching children how to wash their hands properly at an early age.

One of Practical Action’s projects – providing handwashing facilities and teaching children in Peru how to wash their hands properly at an early age.

But globally the hand washing habit has yet to completely solidify, mainly due to lack of soap and water or lack of awareness and understanding of its effectiveness in washing away illness-inducing germs and bacteria.

That’s why on October 15, hundreds of thousands of schools, community groups, organizations, and governments will join together to celebrate Global Handwashing Day. It’s a global advocacy day dedicated to increasing awareness and understanding about the importance of handwashing with soap as an effective and affordable way to prevent diseases and save lives.

Diarrhoea is the second biggest killer of children under five years old.

Every day, around 2,000 children die from diarrhoea. Simply washing hands with soap could reduce the number of these deaths by up to 50%, but many people are not aware of the link between hygiene and health.

This year, Practical Action is using Global Handwashing Day as an opportunity to teach people across the globe a thing or two about good hygiene.

Our team in Nakuru, Kenya, for example, is going to Hyrax Hill primary school to give 2,500 pupils and 500 community members a demonstration on how to wash their hands properly.

Peter Murigi, Practical Action’s urban water, sanitation and hygiene specialist in Kenya, said: “We want to foster and support a culture of handwashing with soap, shine a spotlight on the state of handwashing around the world and raise awareness about the benefits of handwashing with soap at critical times.

“This year’s theme for Global Handwashing Day is “Make handwashing a habit”. The event is a good opportunity to draw attention to the need for change, from individuals, families and governments and by asking for better hygiene policies and commitment to promote better hygiene practices.”

In Bangladesh, we are partnering with other NGOs and the Bangladesh Government’s Department of Public Health Engineering (DPHE) to celebrate the day both centrally in Dhaka and locally. In Dhaka, we’re taking part in a campaign rally and a meeting organised by the DPHE as a co-organiser. Locally, we are the lead organisation in celebrating the day in three districts: Faridpur, Satkhira and Bagerhat.

Practical Action delivers significant water supply, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) programmes and we are ambitious to do more. We promote the community-led sanitation approach with partners and local governments, demonstrating best practice and developing innovative technologies for clean water and waste management. And we work with national and city governments to ensure that poor people are included in sanitation planning.

In Nakuru we have delivered an ambitious project, funded by Comic Relief, to improve the quality of life for slum communities of 190,000 people, by providing access to safe, hygienic toilets and handwashing facilities. You can find out more about that project here and find out what Jack Owino, a headteacher of a school in Kenya, has to say about the impact it has had on staff and children at his school.

Jack Owino is the Headteacher of Eileen Ngochoch Primary School in Nukuru, Kenya.

Jack Owino is the Headteacher of Eileen Ngochoch Primary School in Nukuru, Kenya.

In Bangladesh we have been working with UNICEF in 500 communities and 200 schools across Dhaka and Sylhet to improve sanitation and promote a change in hygiene behaviour.

Children at a school in Bangladesh using their new handwashing facilities.

Children at a school in Bangladesh using their new handwashing facilities.

It has changed the lives of 70,000 students. They are healthier, happier, are able to attend school more regularly and their performance at school has improved. Find out more in this blog by Alamgir Chowdhury in our Bangladesh urban services team.

Projects like this depend on your support. Please help us to work with communities around the world to prevent diseases and save lives and spread the word that more needs to be done to make handwashing a habit.

20 seconds – the difference between life and death

Friday, October 14th, 2016 by

Yesterday marked my first month of working for Practical Action. I’m amazed at how engaged with the projects I feel and how excited I am to be a part of such an interesting organisation after such a short amount of time! So what better way to celebrate than by writing my first blog?!

Intrigued by the buzz around the office about the upcoming campaign, I decided to do a bit of reading around indoor smoke inhalation. One thing that really stood out to me was the strong sense of urgency this particular topic conveys – the clock is ticking and every second matters.

 

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A Nepalese woman and her child cooking on a traditional stove.

20 seconds.

What could you do in this time? Put the kettle on? Send a text message? Or save a life?

“Every 20 seconds a life is lost because a mother like Nafisa has no choice but to cook her family meal on an open fire.”

Indoor smoke caused by cooking on biomass fuels leads to the deaths of over 4.3 million women, children and men worldwide each year.

 
 
Over 95% of households in Darfur use firewood and charcoal to cook on traditional stoves. In a place where much of the surrounding land is desert, the search for useable firewood is time consuming and dangerous. Mothers like Nafisa have no choice but to waste precious hours that could be used to earn an income, risking their lives to collect the firewood they desperately need to be able to feed their children.

But the struggle does not end there for Nafisa. She then has to make the impossible choice to cook the family meal on a stove that billows thick black smoke – smoke that fills her home and gets inside her children’s lungs. She knows that this is slowly poisoning them, but what else can she do?

 

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Training women in Darfur, Sudan to use LPG gas for cooking.

For over 10 years, Practical Action has been working to find and offer clean energy cooking solutions to families living in harsh environments like Darfur. These improved fuel efficient technologies keep families safe and reduce the environmental impact of cooking on biomass fuels. Over the next 10 years we have estimated that this project will save over 400,000 tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions.

Today, you could be part of the solution and help thousands of people across the world. It costs just £112 to buy a stove that could save lives – a stove that would change the life of a family in Sudan forever.

 

With a simple, liquid paraffin gas stove, mothers could cook their daily meal without using firewood or charcoal, which will reduce key pollutants in the environment by over 95%.

So why not make your next 20 seconds count? Make a donation to Practical Action now and help us to stop the killer in the kitchen.

20 seconds.

What will you do?

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Click here to find out more about Nafisa’s story.

 

Resilience – what works, what doesn’t?

Friday, October 14th, 2016 by

In his latest blog Colin McQuistan says that preparedness and response for disasters should be a last resort. The extensive time needed to recover and to rebuild capacity following a disaster in low income countries puts a halt to the development process, lends itself to massive economic costs and endangers lives. There seems little disagreement amongst development professionals that proactively building community resilience to disasters is much more effective at maintaining development than solely reactive interventions.

The Resilience in Practice briefing series that Practical Action has developed through its work on the ground talks about building resilience in volatile environments. As a sector we are moving forward in strides but here’s the thing about resilience – it’s complicated, multi-faceted and with no definitive conclusion on how to measure if we’ve been successful!

Flood victims are evacuated with their children as they rescued by naval boats in a village in Sukkur in Pakistan's Sindh province August 8, 2010.

Flood evacuation in Sukkur, Bangladesh Photo: Reuters/Akhtar Soomro, courtesy www.alertnet.org

This is not disheartening, how we measure resilience has received much attention in recent years and now the Zurich Flood Resilience Alliance has taken this one step further and is currently undergoing a two year testing phase of its Flood Resilient Measurement Tool. We measure communities before a flood through 88 different indicators which feeds into existing processes and is validated through community feedback sessions. The tool design allows practitioners to view the data through several lenses in order to understand existing issues more fully.

Following a significant flood incident a post-event study is undertaken within eight weeks of the disaster. This follow up study looks at the extent of the flooding, the damage people suffered and the action they choose to take. As well as being reviewed by the teams, all the data is fed into a global data set. The aim of the global data set is to understand key questions about resilience measurement. Can we identify a key set of indicators of resilience that expands across contexts, are there indicators that carry more weight in particular contexts and finally what can this global study tell us about how we attempt to build resilience.

I am looking forward to reading the IFRC World Disasters Report launched later today. As two members of the Zurich Flood Resilience Alliance, Practical Action has worked closely with the IFRC on developing the measurement tool and we’ve learned a great deal from one another. Sharing what works and what doesn’t and continually engaging in the global conversation is how we move forward with resilience agenda. Don’t stop!

Read some of the Alliance publications:
Making Communities More Flood Resilient: The Role of Cost Benefit Analysis and Other Decision-Support Tools in Disaster Risk Reduction
What Motivates Households in Vulnerable Communities to Take Flood Preparedness Actions?

Preparing for El Niño floods in Peru