Water Hyacinth

This document suggests solutions for the control of water hyacinth - biological, physical and chemical - and discusses possible practical applications of the plant.
Document Type fact sheet
Language English

By Paul Calvert, Published by Practical Action on 02/02/02

Comments

  • Reply

    Okedeji olabisi said:

    said:
    A very simple and explainary artictle
    on 31/10/11
    • Reply

      qwerty said:

      said:
      very interesting, must of taken me at least 4 hours to read it. i must just read it once more.
      on 17/5/13
  • Reply

    Jennifer said:

    said:
    A very detailed and excellent article
    on 6/12/11
  • Reply

    Susan Omwa said:

    said:
    Very nice document. How do we contact for suggestions
    on 26/12/11
    • Reply

      Neil said:

      neilnoble said:
      You can send us a message from the website at Ask a Question or you can phone us on +44 (0)1926 634400.
      on 19/1/12
  • Reply

    ogunlana ayotide oluwatosin said:

    said:
    it is simple, straight foward and very comprehensive also helpful
    on 15/1/12
  • Reply

    judy ann :D said:

    said:
    i need to find the feasibility of making it as an cardboard and its significance :(((
    on 19/1/12
    • Reply neilnoble said:

      You can find some infomration on making paper from water hyacinth and other plants in the technicla brief Making Paper but this does not have information on making cardboard. Some information is also available from Anamed at Paper and Boards

      The House and Building Research Institute in Dhaka has carried out experimental work on the production of fibre boards from water hyacinth fibre and other indigenous materials. They have developed a locally manufactured production plant for producing fibreboard for general-purpose use and also a bituminised board for use as a low cost roofing material.

      on 19/1/12
  • Reply

    fahrisa said:

    said:
    its really very useful
    on 22/1/12
  • Reply

    Jane said:

    said:
    it is indeed useful but quantify the socio-economic and environmental impacts on riparian communities and compare it with its uses, then you'll know whether it is a friend or an enemy.
    on 5/3/12

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