What are your favourite gadgets?

What are your favourite gadgets (from the Gadget Show Live 2011, or ones that you use)? Do you think they could be developed to transform the lives of poor people across the world? If so, how? What could they be used for?

This discussion is now closed, but you can see see what other Geeks had to say:

Comments

1 | 2 | 3 Most Recent
  • Reply

    Sekundaunda said:

    said:
    Cash credit - often confused with the concept of a cash loan. Cash loan is a loan of money that is granted by a bank or other entity credit. Cash credit is usually spent for any purpose. The amounts of loans ranging from a few hundred gold to 100 000 PLN. Repayment of credit could in theory extend to 8 years. However, the loan period is usually a year or 2 years. There are also cash loans even shorter, even up to 3 months after taking the cash loan. Chwilowki The amount of cash loan depends on net income and the amount of cash loans already taken. The greater the debt of the borrower, the smaller the chance of a very large loan. Examples of where we are in debt in two different banks for the amount of respectively 10 000 15 000 gold and gold is our chance to take another 20 000 are very small. Although you may receive an amount such as 3 000, respectively. Everything depends on whether the installments repaid on a regular basis and we have a regular source of income. Kredyt bez bik
    on 14/7/11
  • Reply

    cardaddy said:

    said:
    Hello mate! I quite agree with your thoughts. Many thanks for posting this.
    on 19/7/11
  • Reply

    David J. Grimshaw said:

    said:
    How do you break the cycle of poverty that starts with a girl fetching water for her family every day and where the burden of that essential duty prevents her from attending school? Suppose she could learn and walk…yes! On the streets of most towns in the UK you will see young people with headphones in their ears listening…to music. What if that technology could be adapted to deliver important knowledge to that girl in Africa on her walk for water? The “podcasting” projects at Practical Action started to be imagined in just this way. How do people learn and exchange information? In conversation…we all do it…you are participating in a conversation reading (and hopefully responding to) this forum! Podcasting, using mp3 players has been successful in improving the livelihoods of the rural poor in Zimbabwe. We are always looking for new ideas, please share yours with us.
    on 4/5/11
  • Reply

    Mansoor Ali said:

    said:
    My favourite technologies are those developed by the poor and I always tried to document them, to see how these could be further improved and supported. In fact, I have a whole list of technologies and systems, which the poor have developed and they reached a scale and benefitted millions. Here is just one example of innovation, similar to felexifuel cars! "There are more than 5000 small businesses of laundry shops in Karachi. Their livelihoods totally depend on the availability of water to wash clothes and electricity to iron them. Both of these services are in short supply in this city of more than 12 million people. The technologies to use less water or recycle water have not been developed in a way to reach a scale, similarly they can’t afford generators for power supply, which some the relatively better off could afford. In the last few years, an innovator has developed a special type of iron and many laundry shops have adopted this. This iron, similar to some of the new flexi fuel cars, could switch the source of energy. These irons have internal burners, which uses natural gas, which is easily available in the market. When electric supply is available, it uses this. Very innovative and addresses a problem created by the failure of centralised systems.
    on 4/5/11
  • Reply

    Mark Bowyer said:

    said:
    I'm not an expert in these matters, but I was interested in the spread of mobile communications technologies, after reading that Nokia was the largest supplier of mobile handsets in Africa. At present basic handsets remain the most popular, but the spread of smart phones in the developed world has pushed additional features into basic handsets. Mobiles can offer voice communication, internet access (with Facebook and Twitter) and in some cases the ability to use media files such as MP3 podcasts, without the need for an extensive cabled communications network. To support this growth I would be interested in seeing a device that would allow people to trickle charge conventional devices using solar power or an alternative means of sustainably providing electricity. And perhaps also a device that could provide or improve mobile carrier signals so that more people are bought within mobile signal coverage.
    on 4/5/11
  • Reply

    David J. Grimshaw said:

    said:
    Mark, you make some interesting comments about combining a mobile with solar power. There is certainly a need for such technology given the number of people who live in remote areas but who can now access mobile telephony. In fact Nokia did produce a phone with a built in solar charger but my understanding is that it did not do well in the market. I would be interested to know why. It could be cost, or it could be problems with solar charging. We have recently been field testing some small solar charging devices for use in combination with our podcasting devices.
    on 4/5/11
  • Reply

    Jayne said:

    said:
    My phone! I know it's just a plain old android phone and it's getting a bit battered now. Years ago I had a camera, a cd player (before that a walkman!), a voice recorder, a telephone, a video player, a map, a photo album, a calculator, a camcorder, a dictionary, a phonebook, an encyclopedia, a newspaper... and now I have a small square of stuff with a screen and it does everything. As mobiles are recycled and recirculated around the world, more people will eventually be able to use these impressive functions for themselves, giving them access to one very powerful thing - information!
    on 4/5/11
  • Reply

    Mansoor Ali said:

    said:
    My favourite technology is the recently introduced tricycles in Central London. Very appropriate for a busy city with narrow streets. It does not need fuel, no carbon and create many employment. I love this, There may be 50 in Central London, though there are 300,00 in the city of Dhaka Bangladesh. In Dhaka it creates employment for many and if supported through research, technologies and policies could address both - poverty and climate concerns. Though it may need a slower path to grow - among fast moving trafiic and highways.
    on 4/5/11
  • Reply

    Mark Bowyer said:

    said:
    Thanks David and Jayne. I imagine providing alternative means of charging would allow people to take advantage of the best or most affordable handsets and carriers, and also charge a number of different devices from radios to torches. I'm not sure if I fully understand the technology, but could it be combined with induction charging? Could this eliminate the need for adpators and cables, allowing people to simply place their devices on the induction plate to charge them? I agree with Jayne, mobile phones can provide access to modern mobile internet and phone services that we can sometimes take for granted. But, we've seen across the Middle East this spring just how powerful a tool the internet and social media can be.
    on 4/5/11
  • Reply

    Gemma Hume said:

    said:
    Mansoor, I agree on the tricycles. I loved the electric bikes at the Gadget Show Live and it made me think about use of these and scooters (solar-powered?) by poor people across the world - providing individual flexible transportation in urban areas and reduced manual labour and improved market access in rural areas.
    on 4/5/11

Replying...