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PISCES Energy Delivery Model Tool

Tailored advice and market mapping for energy access projects

Energy is delivered to users through systems combining infrastructure, businesses, products and services, known as 'business models' or 'delivery models'. Delivery models that prioritise and enable energy access for people living in poverty are critical for poverty reduction and achieving the Millennium Development Goals.

The Energy Delivery Model tool provides energy practitioners and project designers with a greater insight into the successful delivery of energy projects. It has been developed as part of the PISCES international research project to stimulate discussion and reflection on effective approaches to rural energy access.

The tool highlights where particular combinations of energy sources, maintenance plans, management structures and financing may be incompatible, and provides targeted advice that can help practitioners to overcome the barriers to scaling-up projects and create a lasting impact.

The programme creates a customised market map based on information entered by the user, allowing project designers and practitioners to better understand the wider environment that might affect the success of their project.

The Energy Delivery Model tool is designed to provide preliminary analysis for planners and designers of new energy access projects, as well as to improve existing ones. Examples are provided documenting the options used by real energy access projects that have achieved success, allowing users to learn from the experiences of others. Users are also encouraged to submit their own experiences, including challenges they have faced, to build up a range of examples and shared knowledge.

It is important to note that this tool on its own is not enough to ensure a project is a success. The tool enables you to identify all of the stakeholders who will need to be involved in delivering energy access for a particular project. Practical Action and the PISCES project recommend using a participatory approach to bring these people, also known as market actors, together, to ensure that they are all engaged in the design of the project, and support the same vision for change. Learn about Practical Action’s participatory market mapping approach here.

The above energy flow diagram shows how energy is transmitted from the energy resource to the final user. Each  aspect of this will affect the delivery model, and must therefore be carefully considered.

  1. The energy resource, such as sunlight, is initially captured and processed by capital equipment into useful, useable energy (in the example above - solar PV panels).
     
  2. This useable energy, or “energy supply” is inputted into an appliance, which supplies the energy to the user in a useful form, known as the “energy service” (in the example above - lighting).


Scroll down for a glossary of terms.
 

What is the PISCES Project?

PISCES (Policy Innovation Systems for Clean Energy Security) is led by the African Centre for Technology Studies in Kenya, with partners in Sri Lanka, India, Tanzania and the UK. Through action research, it is contributing to innovation and providing new policy-relevant knowledge on bioenergy- leading to better practices and widening energy access to the rural poor in East Africa and South Asia. Practical Action Consulting East Africa, South Asia and UK are all part of PISCES. It is the Energy Research Programme Consortium funded by the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID). Visit: www.pisces.or.ke

Practical Action Consulting

Practical Action Consulting (PAC) is a leader in the field of technology for development, and the consulting arm of Practical Action. PAC’s aim is to increase the reach and impact of Practical Action’s work. With six offices globally, PAC offers high quality, professional consultancy services to influence the work of development practitioners and uplift the lives of the aspiring people at the bottom of the pyramid. Visit: www.practicalaction.org/consulting

Glossary

Energy Resource: The original source of energy, including natural resource such as sunlight, oil, wind, or wood which can be converted into a useable form of energy.

Capital Equipment: The equipment required to capture an energy resource, and convert it into a useable energy supply, up to the point of delivering it to the appliance. Examples include oil powered generators, solar PV panels and charcoal kilns.

Energy Supply: A useable form of energy that can be inputted into an appliance to provide the required energy service. For example, the burning of solid fuels (e.g. wood or charcoal), electricity or mechanical power (e.g. the rotation of flour mill).

Appliance: Any technology, equipment or products used to convert the provided energy supply into the energy service required by the user. For example, light bulbs, stoves or water pumps.

Energy Service: The energy delivered to a user in a useful form such as heating or lighting that can therefore be directly consumed providing measureable and quantifiable benefits.

 

About Pisces          Disclaimer          Contact Pisces          Developed by Practical Action Consulting

Instructions for use

This Energy Delivery Model tool has been created to provide energy practitioners with insight and recommendations into the design and delivery of energy access projects in Developing Countries.

Through answering a series of questions about your specific project, a customised market map with targeted advice is produced, including how to address any particular needs that may arise, and the supporting services the project may require.

  1. To create your customised energy delivery model, simply select Use the tool to get started.

    You can also view the delivery models of a number of existing energy projects by selecting the Examples button.

    The projects are categorised according to the energy resource used.
     
  2. After entering the tool, you will be asked a series of short questions.  Simply select the most appropriate answers for each stage of the process. Please note that more than one box can be selected if appropriate.
     
  3. For more information about each option, hover over it to see a more detailed description, as shown below. 
  1. As you answer the questions and start defining your energy delivery model, options further down the tool may become “incompatible”, or “sometimes compatible”, based on what is possible. If the option is “sometimes compatible”, make sure you are aware of the potential risks that this option may bring.

    If the option is “incompatible”, experience has shown it is not possible and you will need to change previous selections to make it compatible. 
  1. If you want to return to your energy delivery model at a later date, select the “Save” button at the top right, and enter your email address so that you can be identified (this will only be used for identification purposes).
  2. A custom market map will be produced based on your selections, and can be previewed at any point by selecting “Generate Map” to view the progress and effect of selecting different options.

  3. When all questions have been answered, the completed market map will provide a visual model of your market system, including which actors need to be involved in the model, and the enabling environment it sits within (as shown below).
  1. To learn more about each component of your market map click on each coloured section and a key to each service will appear.
  2. When you’ve completed your delivery model, the Finish page contains several useful features. Bespoke advice is provided regarding how to improve your delivery model, and common issues to watch out for.

  3. To print the information provided click the “Print” button to select your print options, or to save it as a PDF select “Print to File” in your print options.
  4. You can also submit your project to the tool’s database which will be used as an example for others. To do this click on “Submit Project”, and enter a few details on the next page. Your project will then appear under the examples menu; it is the aim of the tool to build up a database of projects and their delivery models, which can then be used as a learning tool for others for their future energy projects.

    Please note that personal details are only collected to identify your model and for future login and will never be shared with a third party.


    NOTE: Users should be aware that the advice provided in this tool is given in order to provide insight and preliminary analysis to the design of a project. For a more complete project design, Practical Action’s experience has shown that all market actors must share the same vision for change, and agree on the process required. It is essential that a participatory approach is used engaging all the actors in order to create an effective and sustainable project.
     

Glossary

Energy Resource: The original source of energy, including natural resource such as sunlight, oil, wind, or wood which can be converted into a useable form of energy.

Capital Equipment: The equipment required to capture an energy resource, and convert it into a useable energy supply, up to the point of delivering it to the appliance. Examples include oil powered generators, solar PV panels and charcoal kilns.

Energy Supply: A useable form of energy that can be inputted into an appliance to provide the required energy service. For example, the burning of solid fuels (e.g. wood or charcoal), electricity or mechanical power (e.g. the rotation of flour mill).

Appliance: Any technology, equipment or products used to convert the provided energy supply into the energy service required by the user. For example, light bulbs, stoves or water pumps.

Energy Service: The energy delivered to a user in a useful form such as heating or lighting that can therefore be directly consumed providing measureable and quantifiable benefits.

 

About Pisces          Disclaimer          Contact Pisces          Developed by Practical Action Consulting

View:

STOVE PROJECTS:

Aprovecho Research Centre and and Shengzhou Stove Manufacturer

SOLAR PROJECTS:

GERES, Himalayan Greenhouses (2009 Ashden Award Winner)

Grameen Shakti Solar PV

ECAMI Solar PV Rural Development, Nicaragua (2009 Ashden Award Winner)

BIOENERGY PROJECTS:

Saran Renewable Energy - Biomass Gasification

HYDRO PROJECTS:

Community Mini-Hydro Project

FOSSIL FUEL PROJECTS:

Darfur LPG Stove Project

WIND PROJECTS:

Community Small-Scale Wind Generation, Perú

MECHANICAL POWER PROJECTS:

AIDFI Village Water Ram Pump, Philippines (2007 Ashden Award Winner) 

 

About Pisces          Disclaimer          Contact Pisces          Developed by Practical Action Consulting

USE THE TOOL

Login to retrieve your existing Delivery model
 

About Pisces | Disclaimer | Contact Pisces | Developed by Practical Action Consulting

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