Fruit Juice Processing

This brief looks at juice extraction, preparation, pasteurisation, bottling, quality control, and equipment suppliers.

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  • Reply

    kumar said:

    said:
    how to make carrot-papaya juice commercially with added preservatives?
    on 22/10/11
    • Reply

      Barrie from Practical Action said:

      said:
      Foods can be divided into two major groups: -those with a high acidity ( below a pH of 4.5). In these only yeasts and mould can grow which in most cases will not pose a public health risk. -those of low acidity (pH above 4.5). Here many food poisoning bacteria can grow including coliforms, salmonella and botulins. These pose a very serious risk to consumers, even death. Both carrot and papaya are low acid and so fall into the second group. Hence my advice. I suggest you consider other products that are acid, say papaya and lime? Sorry to be negative but better to be warned.
      on 30/11/11
  • Reply said:
    physiochemical and sensory evaluation of nectar produced from pineapple, guava, banana.
    on 7/11/11
  • Reply

    stuck in science said:

    said:
    why is important to test the ph of fruit juice before it goes to the shops
    on 12/1/12
    • Reply

      Neil Philip Noble said:

      said:
      The ph level is one of the main criteria for assessing the safety of the product. The acid in the juice helps to prevent the growth of bacteria which can be dangerous.
      on 6/3/12
    • Reply

      Barrie Axtell said:

      dawn said:

      I have been asked to respond to your question on pH and fruit juices.

      Firstly it is not necessary to check the pH of each batch provided each is made to the same recipe. pH is very important in the control of the growth of micro-organisms. Essential foods can be divided into two groups:.

      those with a pH below 4. Here only yeasts and moulds can grow and pose a very low public health risk.

      those with a pH above 4. Here food poisoning bacterial such as coliforms, salmonella and botulins can grow. These pose a serious risk of food poisoning or in extreme cases death.

      Hence the importance of pH. Most fruits are acid, some such as papaya are on the borderline and may need added acid, perhaps as lemon juice. Other such as watermelon are non-acidic.

      So again once you have a recipe and stick to it routine Ph checks are not required.

      Hope this helps.

      on 7/3/12
    • Reply

      Auwal said:

      said:
      Cotaminant from steel material and method of evaluation
      on 29/3/12
  • Reply

    arigbede abimbola said:

    said:
    which of d fruit is acidic am interested
    on 15/1/12
  • Reply

    Lilian said:

    said:
    What quantity of sodium benzoate can one use to preserve 5 litres of fruit juice ?
    on 16/1/12
    • Reply

      Barrie Axtell said:

      said:
      Dear Lilian

      I have been passed your enquiry on sodium benzoate levels and have sought advice from the Food Standards Agency, hence the delay in replying.

      The maximum level in fruit juices is 150ppm or parts per million.

      This means 150g of benzoate per 1000 litres. I am sure you can work it out from there.As your batches are small, say 5 litres I suggest you make a 10% stock solution of benzoate dissolved in water which could then be added using a small measuring cylinder. This would save the expense of an accurate balance.

      I do make suggest you check with your local standards people as different countries have different rules.

      Hope this helps.

      on 7/3/12

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