Sudan | Blogs

  • Spreading the message on animal health


    November 28th, 2017

    The overall objective of the LESP-ES animal health project is to contribute to poverty reduction and to eradicate food insecurity in Sudan by improving the livelihoods and resilience of rural smallholders in Kassala, Gedarif and Red Sea states through enhancing livestock productivity.

    The purpose of the project is to ensure that appropriate animal disease surveillance and control is operational in these three states of Eastern Sudan. This will be achieved through improved effectiveness of epidemio–surveillance and control of trans-boundary animal diseases.

    Improvements in veterinary services aim to achieve the following:

    1. Strengthen capacities for epidemio-surveillance and control of cross-boundary animal diseases.
    2. Improve the diagnostic capacities of veterinary laboratories and quarantine facilities
    3. Build awareness and competency of stakeholders to improve animal health and to enhance resilience against epidemics and other animal health related environmental hazards.

    To achieve the third objective it is important to increase the awareness and skills of smallholders and community-based organizations on subjects related to animal health.  This will be achieved through  different activities such as disseminating  leaflets and posters to smallholders, agro-pastoralist communities and community-based organizations including women about relevant diseases.  In addition television and radio show will introduce live dramas, using music and comedy to attract the attention of targeted groups.

    Those different types of communication, using targeted messages to raise awareness of animal diseases were formulated in a simple, attractive way to ensure acceptance and deliver an easy way for people to understand complex scientific materials. Colourful posters and leaflets with plenty of pictures, were distributed during field campaigns, extension meetings, vaccination and treatment missions.

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  • Our hands, our future


    November 24th, 2017

    Since 2008, Global Handwashing Day has been celebrated annually, worldwide on 15 October.  It presents an opportunity to campaign, motivate and mobilize people around the world to improve their handwashing habits by raising awareness about the benefits of handwashing with soap.

    This year Practical Action’s UKAid funded Aqua4East project, in collaboration with Kassala Women Association Network, (KWDAN) celebrated the day with the local community of Darasta, a village with a population of 7850 which lies 30 km north of Kassala. The theme was ‘Our health is in our hands.’

    Both Practical Action and KWDAN are active in the area, upgrading the water infrastructure, conducting sanitation activities with school clubs, and health promoters.  We are currently constructing two public latrines, and training local people in low tech block making. These activities aim at improving hygiene and changing behaviour.

    The Darasta community gathered at the local school for a full day program of speeches, music and drama.  KWDAN distributed hand washing equipment, soap bars, t-shirts, and posters. Certificates of appreciation were also awarded to a number of key community members and to organizations working with the community.

    Practical Action’s Water for East project manager Mr Musa Ibrahim said:

    Global Handwashing Day is an annual advocacy day dedicated to increasing awareness and understanding about the importance of hand washing with soap as an easy, effective, and affordable way to prevent diseases and save lives”

    KWDAN Director Ms Hanan Zayed said:

    “In our state few use soap to wash their hands because soap and water for handwashing might be less accessible; we need to wash our hands with soap and water to dramatically cut the number of young children who get sick. Hand washing with soap could prevent about 1 out of every 10 episodes of diarrhoeal illnesses and almost 1 out of 6 episodes of respiratory infection, this can be simple and inexpensive.”

    The event was recorded and broadcast on Kassala State television.

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  • Veterinary checkpoints in Kassala


    November 14th, 2017

    The three states of eastern Sudan, Kassala, Gadarif and Red Sea, are among the poorest in Sudan.  Chronic poverty and food insecurity is widespread. More than two thirds of the region’s population live in rural areas and more than a third of poor households in these states keep livestock.

    Despite raising an estimated 15.2 million beasts in 2012, representing approximately 17% of Sudan’s livestock, the livestock sector remains severely under-developed. Once of the main problems facing this sector in Sudan, and Eastern Sudan in particular, is the high prevalence of animal diseases, including trans-boundary diseases. These have the potential to seriously affect the health, productivity and trade of livestock and therefore constitute a real threat to rural and pastoral livelihoods.

    State veterinary authorities lack the resources and capacity to detect, monitor and control trans-boundary animal diseases. This is compounded by the weakness of veterinary services and poor infrastructure facilities across the region. Nevertheless, there is considerable potential to increase the level of protection from animal disease by strengthening institutional capacities for epidemio-surveillance and coordination of trans-boundary animal disease control at the state level.

    The European Commission has allocated EUR 3,500,000 under a “Special Fund” for Sudan to address the needs of the most vulnerable populations in Sudan, to support the livestock sector.  It aims to enhance livestock disease control to improve production and trade in East Sudan.

    The Livestock Epidemio-surveillance project – East Sudan (LESP-ES) is being implemented in collaboration between Practical Action Sudan, the Federal Ministry of Livestock, Fisheries & Rangelands and the state ministries of Animal Resources in Sudan’s eastern states (Red Sea, Kassala and Gadarif).

    Kassala state is one of the three beneficiary states of LESP-ES. The state has a rich variety of animal species.

    One of the activities is the establishment of veterinary check points for monitoring animal disease. The check points monitor animal movements to conrol the spread of epidemic diseases (either across boundaries or national states) through professionally recognized activities.

    There are also additional tasks assigned to veterinary check points, namely vaccination services, treatment, awareness raising and disease surveys benefiting the pastoralists, small breeders, farmers, and cattle traders in Kassala State.

    In cooperation with the state General Directorate of Animal Resources, Practical Action Sudan has established five veterinary check points in the form of caravans, distributed in logical geographical locations to provide veterinary services.

    The caravan contains an office and a bedroom for the workers. It was also provided with a motorbike as a means of transport for the technician working at the site under the supervision of a veterinarian. Every check point receives regular visits by veterinarian with a mobile veterinary unit to connect the five points with the state headquarters. Caravan and mobile units are well equipped with all their needs for camps, field work and field diagnostics.

    These points were a real addition to disease surveillance efforts and the geographical expansion of veterinary services to the target beneficiaries.

    Khalil Zayed Ibrahim – deputy General Manager Animal Wealth said:  “Check points also contributed positively in drawing a preliminary picture of the animal disease map in the state through sharing in surveys which followed by data analysis to gain fruitful information that leading to better disease control plans.”

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  • New animal vaccination and inspection facilities in Kassala


    November 14th, 2017

    The administration of quarantine and meat inspection in Sudan lies with the Federal Ministry of Animal Resources. Because of the density and diversity of animal wealth in the eastern sector of Sudan (including Kassala state) and the strategic location of the state in the field of livestock breeding and trade and its economic importance, the veterinary authorities have created a center for vaccination and inspection.

    A number of activities have been included in the project, which is managed and implemented in a positive partnership between Practical Action-Sudan and the Ministry of Animal Resources.  The project has provided significant support in improving the working environment by providing items such as furniture, communications equipment and sprayers. It also supported the reporting and information systems through providing internet access.

    The project has implemented a sophisticated refrigeration supply chain for the storage of vaccines and collection of samples for lab diagnosis, in addition to equipment for vaccination, protective clothing and vaccine delivery ice-boxes.

    The state quarantine department was also provided with mechanical sprayers for spraying of external parasites and pests to avoid vector-borne diseases.

    This was reflected in the provision of a quality and sophisticated service  to control the risk of diseases that may affect the flow of animal trade out of the country, as reflected in the managed data at the quarantine department of Kassala state.

    Dr. Molhima said;

    “These quarantine machines helped in saving time and effort. Many thanks to Practical Action for their support.”

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  • Better veterinary services in remote areas


    October 12th, 2017

    The EU funded Livestock Epidemio Surveillance Programme for Eastern Sudan (LESP-ES) aims to establish effective  epidemio-surveillance and control of trans-boundary animal diseases and priority diseases and link with national institutional frameworks through strengthening capacities for epidemio-surveillance.

    Different activities were conducted to accomplish this including the provision of three check points on the border with Ethiopia, at Basunda in Taya and Galabat as well as Alassera in Guresha.  There are also three interstate check points at Shajarab and Sada  between Gedarif and Kassala State and Khyary between Gedarif and Gezera State.

    In order to provide proper veterinary services at those points, the programme has supplied nine motorbikes at these check points in addition to the three motorbikes already in Gebesha Aburakham and Sefawa to cover the long borders.

    Veterinary technicians were appointed to take responsibility for providing veterinary services and monitoring livestock movements in these vital area, taking into account that livestock  know no borders in their search for pasture and water.

    The programme has helped improve the of skills and experience of veterinary technicians through multiple training courses for those at checkpoints among others.

    Hassan Yousif Abdalla From Guresha was one of these technicians deployed  at the Alassera check point near the Ethiopian border. He expressed his appreciation for the role played by the programme and Practical Action in supporting veterinary services in remote rural areas where it is difficult to find veterinarians because numbers in the state are low.  He said that having an office here was a dream come true. Now it’s much easier to deliver veterinary services and to work with people in different villages as well as those who come asking for help.

    Hassan said that before the motorbikes arrived it was difficult to monitor livestock movements or provide support to pastoralists and animal owners because villages were so scattered  and the roads unpaved.

    “Now I can travel to all surrounding villages and provide veterinary services and meat inspections and to investigate all outbreaks of disease whenever I’m notified.  I can even provide help to pastoralists and animal owners across the border with Ethiopia. They come and ask for help because we are neighbours and have a common weekly livestock market in this area.  The programme had provided me with a mobile phone so anyone can reach me.  I can always ask  the local animal resources directorate for advice when I need it.”

    Hassan said that he provides treatment and extension services even at household level and his work covers more than thirteen villages.  He performs meat inspections at the weekly livestock market and monitors the meat provided at local restaurants for the sake of better public health.

    Hassan is sure of the importance of checkpoints as means of providing veterinary services to poor people in marginalized areas but has some worries about the sustainability of the service after withdrawal programme support.

    Livestock owner Adam Nemer said that the presence of check points in the area encouraged farmers to concentrate on their herds because it is easier now to find support when needed.  He explained:

    “Hassan helps us a lot.  He treats sick animals and provides guidance and advice on how to rear the herd and how to avoid diseases through better nutrition.  He also encourages us to undertake routine vaccination in order to prevent major disease outbreaks.”

    Finally Hassan explained that the caravan should be provided with extra veterinary field tools that would help them in performing their duties.

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  • A step forward for women’s empowerment


    September 25th, 2017

    Livestock Epidemic Surveillance Programme (LESP) , funded by the European Community aims to improve awareness and skills of rural livestock producers and other stakeholders in animal health and production.  It is supporting this community initiative in collaboration with the Animal Resources Directorate in Wassat.  They have formed more than 200 women pastoralist committees covering most of the villages in the region, which have been registered as official committees.

    In addition they helped obtain finance from banks with direct support from the Sudan National Bank as part of a national policy to support the livelihoods of the rural poor. Each household was given three sheep to be raised by the family. The Animal Resource Directorate monitors each committee’s monthly payments to the bank and the health of these small herds.  They have conducted several treatment campaigns which have shown to have had a positive impact on the welfare and livelihoods of rural families.

    Practical Action led the process of forming the women’s pastoralist committee network. Building on its legacy of empowering rural communities especially women and contributing to gender equality through mainstreaming gender issues, we aim to build better understanding of the positive role of such networks in fostering better performance.

    In order to help these pastoralist committees rear their small  herds the programme conducted several training courses related to animal health.  Women attending were shown how to judge the proper health condition of their animals, how to identify a sick animal, which diseases should case major concern and their symptoms and treatment.  The importance of notification of disease to the veterinary authorities and vaccination were among other topics covered.

    The committee’s executives were also trained on project management and financial procedures in order to be able to run their own business.

    Consultation between the partners led to the decision to support a veterinary drug store as a revolving fund  managed by the women pastoralist committees network Executive desk, under the direct supervision of  Animal Resources Directorate at Wassat.

    The programme provided office furniture, stationery and drugs while the Ministry of Animal Resources issued a veterinary drugstore license and appointed a veterinary technician to supervise the service.

    The Department of Health in Wassat offered to host the store in their new health clinic at Abu Alnaja.  This clinic with provide pastoral women with drugs and veterinary assistance at a moderate price which, managed wisely will generate revenue for a revolving fund.

    The opening ceremony of the veterinary drugstore took place on 18 September. The Ministry of Animal Resources was represented by His Excellency the Animal Resources Minister as well as the East Sudan office coordinator and LESP-ES local technical advisor, and representatives from Wassat’s legislative council, members of the women’s pastoralist committees and  villagers of Abu Alnaja villages.

    Following the opening of the store, there was an exhibition,  speeches and a drama.  The ceremony was attended by  students of the University of Alneelen’s Faculty of Animal Production on their annual scientific trip, who indicated their appreciation of the idea and the support given to the community.

     

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  • A better life for women and girls


    B26, Sudan, | August 8th, 2017

    Poverty, marginalisation, traditions and customs together with gender blind plans and policies contribute to gender inequality in Sudan.

    Women and girls are traditionally responsible of all domestic work in Sudanese houses.  Moreover, they are burdened by water and wood daily fetching journeys which consume between three to eight hours per day in the dry regions of Darfur, Kordofan and East Sudan. Housewives spend much time and effort on unpaid activities (water and wood fetching) and are exposed to sometimes fatal hazards associated with sexual violence, abortion incidences and severe injuries.

    Water pump SudanAdolescent girls often drop out of school to help their families with domestic work and to look after their younger siblings in the absence of mothers. Young women lack the knowledge and skills required to engage in formal employment and are trapped in the poverty cycle without any income generating sources.

    These dependant girls are usually married under-age which increases morbidity and mortality rates among mothers and newborns. Registered early marriage between girls 15-19 years reached 26% in the rural areas of Sudan. Shockingly, child marriage for girls under 15 reaches 10% in the same areas.

    Practical Action Sudan puts women at the heart of its work. In our three year strategic business plan 2017-2020, we intend to prioritise women needs and transform their lives in a positive way that will impact the whole community.

    Women associations and institutions are identified as key actors in our programme. They represent our main implementing partners and supporting researchers in the field of clean fuels. Rural women are involved in our projects at community level and participate in the development process through participating in activities such as membership of water committees in WASH projects. They also manage women farms in agricultural-resilience projects and grow nutritious food for their children and to increase families’ incomes.

    WDAN, SudanThrough increasing women participation; we open the door for thousands of women to be socially empowered. Our participatory approaches and actions ensure that women needs and priorities are well-represented and they are equally involved in the projects.

    “I and village’s women walk to fetch water in the early morning and return back by the sunset! our kids stay without food for long time.” Haleema, 43 years old, from Mogabil Village, North Darfur

    Building the capacity of rural women and girls is one of the most important strategies of tackling poverty among women and their families. Training programs support women to become effective income generators, and empower them to create their own market opportunities and improve their livelihoods.

    community meeting sudanMany life changing experiences on the ground tell inspiring stories about Sudanese women who have moved from poverty, dependency and ignorance into productivity, independence and participation in decision-making as a socio-economical impact of our development interventions in rural areas. I believe that the approaches we adopt are very effective, as women’s empowerment is not a decision to be taken or a service to be delivered; it is a process of improving the environment of women and equipping them with the necessary knowledge and skills to find their way and embrace opportunities with dignity.

    “The training program delivered by Practical Action staff has empowered us and upgraded our capacity to expand our network and reach greater number of rural women.” Hanan Zayed, Head of Kassala Women Development Associations Network

    Our team in Sudan will continue the steps we have planned toward empowering women and changing their lives. We believe that the track toward gender transformation is long and tough; however continuous hard work and advocacy efforts will ensure we achieve our ambition and help millions of Sudanese women to achieve the good life they deserve.

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  • Mesquite clearance in Darassa – from dream to reality


    July 25th, 2017

    Ahmed Mohammed Tahir Betay, President of Kassala state Legislative Council and former commissioner of Telkuk, admired the Darassa catchment integrated water resource action plan, saying that ‘to demonstrate the whole is better than only a part’.

    Mesquite clearance in DarassaHe decided to help implement this action plan by sharing his knowledge of cleaning mesquite from Telkuk town when he was commissioner there. This resulted in increased water supply in hand dug wells during the dry season.  So he will have support for this idea in Darassa, along with the scientific evidence and feasibility studies for the subsurface dam and the rehabilitation of Girgir Dam.

    The action plan aims to increase groundwater recharging and promote water facilities in Darassa. This village, which has a small reservoir and nine hand pumps, suffers from chronic water shortages during dry season .

    In community gathering in the village level Ahamed Mohamed Tahir launched the idea of removing mesquite, an invasive tree which affects both water availability and agricultural production.

    Increased water in wellsAt the gathering  during his visit to the subsurface dam construction in Darassa he said:

    “I realize that the subsurface dam is a new scientific innovation for this area and I hope it will be successful.  But besides that we will clear the mesquite which will be a bonus.  I declare to you all that Darassa catchment will be clear from mesquite and I am here to launch it. My contribution is the excavator machine and the community will cover the fuel, lubricant and operational and driving costs. We will lead the process from here to other places Practical Action working in Girgir dam, Misud and elsewhere. ’’

    This declaration puts Practical Action Sudan and the community on the verge of great hope.  There are challenges  and accountability issues, so the big question is whether this tremendous opportunity can be implemented well.  It is hope that, with this leadership from the government all partners will share in supporting this enterprise.

     

     

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  • From despair to dignity – emergency response project in Sudan


    May 24th, 2017

    Heavy rain that hit the eastern region of Sudan in the summer of 2016 and flashfloods, caused substantial damage to communities in Kassala state.  This posed unique challenges and exposed local communities to different areas of vulnerability.

    In response, Practical Action and Plan Sudan, working in the Aqua4East Partnership, a water  project in the region, developed a six months emergency response initiative to protect the  area from the negative impacts of the emergency situation. The priority was to help the affected communities respond to, and rapidly recover from this disaster, and to strengthen their resilience to future natural crises. Practical Action focused on addressing the life-saving needs of vulnerable affected people through a holistic water, sanitation, and hygiene programme.

    This story of Adam and his family is just one of thousands of success stories of families that benefited from the this project in Kassala, one of the country’s poorest states.

    Await village is 35km north of Kassala city. The region suffers from chronic poverty, food insecurity, lack of access to basic facilities, and limited support from state government. The people of Await are extremely poor; they lack the basic facilities of life; including education, health, and hygiene. The local culture and social restrictions imposed by the community keeps girls out of classroom education.

    Adam Mohamed Abu Fatima is a 45 year old man whose life has been a hard struggle for him and his family.

    I used to have no hope and was never able to help my family.

    His wife is terminally ill due to unhealthy food and lack of income. Adam really wanted to help her, but the costs of medicines, and seeing a doctor were too high. He has five children, two boys and three girls. The two boys and the youngest girl are enrolled in primary school. The two older girls help the family make a living, look after their mother, and take care of other domestic work.

    Adam’s story shows how much change can come about when a family works together and supports each other.

    Adam used to earn his living from carrying water  and fetching firewood.  He earned around his earning were on average SDG 20 per day (£2.30). Things started to improve when the water committee in Twaite purchased him a donkey cart fitted with two water drums to supply water on a daily basis to the latrines newly constructed by the Emergency Response Project.  These were built to reduce the practice of open area defection and subsequently reduce contamination and spread of diseases in the village. Adam also uses this donkey cart  to sell water to the community. His income has increased by SDG 100 (£12) per day, after putting aside enough to feed the donkey and keep it healthy and for cart maintenance.  He also makes a daily contribution of SDG 20 (£2.30) to the water committee.

    The donkey cart contributed by the project and managed by the village Water Committee

    Adam is so pleased about how things are changing for him and his family. He can now help his neighbours by supplying water for them.  His family learned how to keep chickens and have bought six chickens and one cockerel and are now breeding hens.  The eggs were great for the children and the rest are sold at the local market. His daughters look after the chickens, clean the house, and cook for the family.

    One of the three latrine blocks constructed by the project in the village

    The family works as a team, Adam’s elder daughter attended the farm training facilitated by the project and is now starting to cultivate her own small home farm, making use of the availability of water and the donkey’s manure to improve the fertility of the soil on her farm for increased crop production.  Neighbours are now coming to find out how they farm and they help others whenever possible, so the family, their neighbours and the community are all better off.

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  • Success story of a water initiative


    April 19th, 2017

    Haladete-East is a village located 40 km North from the city of Kassala, Eastern Sudan. It is a home of over 4,800 people, from which 2,850 are women. This is a story of an amazing water initiative that benefited not only one family but the entire village of Haladete-East!

    Access to water has always been a serious problem in Haladete-East. Because there was no water nearby, people had to walk every day nearly three hours, through deserted roads, to collect water. Their only source of water was a remote hand-pump that was unreliable. The walks to collect water were tough and because of the heavy weight, only limited amount of water could be brought back to the village. Because of this, water could only be used to absolute necessities such as cooking and drinking.

    To solve the problem, Practical Action launched a project called Aqua4East. The project, funded by DFID, aimed to improve the water security for the benefit of the whole community. To do this, Practical Action needed to build a water tank that would be big enough to provide water for 4800 people!

    The first step in the project was to identify a location with a steady underground water supply (through hydrological studies and water catchment surveys). This ensured that the water supply would not run dry – even during the driest times. Once the right location was selected, Practical Action build the water tank, including two different distribution stations. One station was for women and the other for men. Each station included six water taps.

    What makes this project so special, is the substantial community engagement. With the help of Practical Action, people living in the village established a Water Committee that looked after the management of the water distribution, including financial management and preparations should a damage occur.

    Because of the Aqua for East initiative, the life of the people living in Haladete-East is now easier, healthier, more dignified and joyful. To summarise:women celebrating

    1. People do not need to walk long distances to collect water anymore. They now have an easy access to clean water for drinking, cooking and cleaning. In addition, small scale farming and animal farming have benefited from the secured water supply.

    2. The initiative has had a tremendous impact on improved hygiene. Villagers are now able to wash their hands and shower more often, to do laundry and clean their homes. Furthermore, the food is less contaminated and diet more healthier due to in-house cultivated vegetables.

    3. More girls are going to school instead of collecting water. In addition, they have more time to socialise and participate in income generating activities.

    Nafish O’shak, one of the villagers, said: Before, the community health promoters used to give us strong hygiene advice, but without water we could not do what we were advised to do. Now we have sufficient water and we are very hygienic. Our clothes, food and houses are extremely clean.

    Is that a revolutionary impact or what?

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